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Re: lots of holes in doublet...


From: Gerry Embleton
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2003 10:17:04 +0200

"Doublet full of holes..."

...and "what its got in its pocketsis" has been an obsession of mine  
for years. Roughly translated it means "everything and anything worn  
under armour" and "almost any kind of every day object".

"Doublet full of holes"... describes a garment made of three or 4  
layers of linen (and no doubt many other things) sewn with "eyelets",  
like one makes to take points, placed very very close together. The  
stitches touch and make a reenforcing web of threads, the eyelet holes  
let the air pass. A solid 15th century thermal vest. A frightening  
amount of work was involved but labour was very very cheap. Those of  
you with small trusting children have a chance of making one if you  
grab the kids and start them working now!

Several exist today in museum collections, they are difficult to date,  
may have been quite common - and once made are pretty tough and long  
lasting. They can be easily cut up and adapted to new fashions. Rather  
like mail shirts, which may have ended an active life of some hundreds  
of years by being cut up to line Brigandines, jacks and fencing  
clothes, some 15th century "doublets F.O.H." may have ended up as parts  
of stays and corsets or as 18th century fencing defenses.

Nothing can be judged about the popularity of an item by how many  
survive today. It is usually rarities that are treasured and preserved.  
Common everyday objects are usually used to death.

Let all members of the Company call upon Saynte George to help any of  
our brothers or sisters venturing on such a work, may they survive the  
999'th hole with their minds and fingers intact...
Regards,

Gerry


On Sunday, June 15, 2003, at 11:54  AM, Tomaszek wrote:

> Hello to all!!!
>
> I`m looking for inormations about "fustian doublet full of hollis"
> ("Medieval Military Costume" plate 9)...
>
> were those doublets made only of fustian, or maybe linen material  
> tooo? how
> do You think?? does enybody know how should it look like (in general -  
> in
> book I can see only a very small part of it :(  )... Does anybody  
> tried to
> do something like that???? Any infos will be helpfull for me... :D
>
> thanks in advance
> Tom
>
>
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------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
-
Gerry Embleton - Time Machine AG
La Chaîne 15. CH-2515 Prêles. ++41 (0)32 315 23 93
www.time-machine.ch


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